Sunday, December 6, 2009

Where does the "TT" in Audi TT come from?

Isle of Man TT races "Tourist Trophy"


The Audi TT takes its name from the successful racing tradition of NSU in the British Isle of Man TT motorcycle race. NSU began competing in the TT in 1911, and later merged into the company now known as Audi.[2]

The Audi TT also follows the NSU 1000TT, 1200TT and TTS cars of the 1960s in being named for the race.

The Audi TT Roadster was presented in Detroit in 1999 under the name Audi TTS

Origins of the Audi TT design

Audi TT - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "The development of the Audi TT began in September 1994 at the Audi Design Center in California.[citation needed] The TT was first shown as a concept car at the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show. The design is credited to J Mays and Freeman Thomas,[1] with Martin Smith and Romulus Rost contributing to the award winning interior design. A previously unused laser welding adaptation which enabled seamless design features on the first-generation TT also delayed its introduction."

Saturday, December 5, 2009

Intercooler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Intercooler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Many older turbo-charged cars, such as the Toyota Supra (JZA80 only), Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo, Nissan 200SX (S13/14/14a/15), Mitsubishi 3000gt, Saab 900, Volkswagen, Audi TT, and Turbo Mitsubishi Eclipse use side-mounted air-to-air intercoolers (SMIC), which are mounted in the front corner of the bumper or in front of one of the wheels. Side-mounted intercoolers are generally smaller, mainly due to space constraints, and sometimes two are used to gain the performance of a larger, single intercooler."
...
As well as allowing a greater volume of air to be admitted to an engine, intercoolers have a key role in controlling the internal temperatures in a turbocharged engine. When fitted with a turbo (as with any form of supercharging), the engine's specific power is increased, leading to higher combustion and exhaust temperatures. The exhaust gases passing through the turbine section of the turbocharger are usually around 450 °C (840 °F), but can be as high as 1000 °C (1830 °F) under extreme conditions. This heat passes through the turbocharger unit and contributes to the heating of the air being compressed in the compressor section of the turbo. If left uncooled this hot air enters the engine, further increasing internal temperatures. This leads to a build up of heat that will eventually stabilise, but this may be at temperatures in excess of the engine's design limits- 'hot spots' at the piston crown or exhaust valve can cause warping or cracking of these components. This effect is especially found in modified or tuned engines running at very high specific power outputs. An efficient intercooler removes heat from the air in the induction system, preventing the cyclic heat build-up via the turbocharger, allowing higher power outputs to be achieved without damage.


Compression by the turbocharger causes the intake air to heat up, rather than the air being heated by contact with the hot turbocharger itself, the vast majority is through the act of compression (ideal gas law) plus added heat due to compressor inefficiencies (adiabatic efficiency). The extra power obtained from forced induction is due to the extra air available to burn more fuel in each cylinder. This sometimes requires a lower compression ratio be used, to allow a wider mapping of ignition timing advance before detonation occurs (for a given fuel's octane rating). Although a lower compression ratio generally lowers combustion efficiency and costs power."

My 2001 Audi TT Insurance Policy from State Farm ...


Do you think this policy is too expensive?
'Vorsprung Dirch Technik' [ Advantage Through Technology" - Audi's German Tagline. Audi will import 5000 roadsters into North America for an on-sale date of April 2000. Half of these will be equipped as Quattros, and only 1250 are expected to be the 225-horsepower version. So what the heck does TT stand for anyway? That would be "Tourist Trophy" as in Great Britain's historic racing series of the Isle of Man. TT Now Stands for Terrifically Topless.

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